Tag Archives: BBC

Florence and The Machine: ‘Ceremonials’ + ‘Shake It Out’ – Art Work, Track List & Interview


Following the unveiling of ‘What The Water Gave Me’ as the first taster of Florence’s new material, we today announce that her second album will be entitled ‘Ceremonials’!
And that’s not all – we can also reveal the artwork for the very first time, take a look at it below and let us know what you think on Flo’s Forum or Facebook.

In more great news, you can now pre-order your copy from iTunes.
The digital version of the album comes in Deluxe and Standard formats,
here are the tracklistings for both.

Deluxe

1. Only If For A Night
2. Shake It Out
3. What The Water Gave Me
4. Never Let Me Go
5. Breaking Down
6. Lover To Lover
7. No Light, No Light
8. Seven Devils
9. Heartlines
10. Spectrum
11. All This And Heaven Too
12. Leave My Body
13. What The Water Gave Me (Video)

14. Remain Nameless
15. Strangeness & Charm
16. Bedroom Hymns
17. What The Water Gave Me (demo)
18. Landscape (demo)
19. Heartlines (acoustic)
20. Shake It Out (acoustic)

Pre-order your copy now.

Standard

1. Only If For A Night
2. Shake It Out
3. What The Water Gave Me
4. Never Let Me Go
5. Breaking Down
6. Lover To Lover
7. No Light, No Light
8. Seven Devils
9. Heartlines
10. Spectrum
11. All This And Heaven Too
12. Leave My Body
13. What The Water Gave Me (Video)

Pre-order your copy now.

Don’t forget, you can order the physical versions of the album from Flotique and you’ll also receive a free limited edition poster print.
‘Ceremonials’ is released on October 31st in the UK.
We can also today reveal that the first single to be taken from ‘Ceremonials’ will be ‘Shake It Out’.
‘Shake It Out’ will be available in the UK from October 2, stay tuned for pre-order details coming soon.
In the meantime check out the artwork below.

The track will recieve it’s first radio play from Zane Lowe on his Radio 1 show on Wednesday (September 14) and Flo will also be joining him for an exclusive interview.
Make sure you tune into the show from 7pm via the BBC website, DAB radio or 97.7-99.7FM.
If you miss the show head to http://www.florenceandthemachine.net from 8pm where you’ll also be able to hear it.

Meet the rising stars of UK hip-hop


K Koke
K Koke

UK hip-hop was once the stomping ground of champions such as Roots Manuva, London Posse and Skinnyman. But nearly a decade on, after grime’s ever-expanding success a new wave of rappers is emerging. They don’t have press shots. Most still have other jobs or play out their rhymes in their daily hustle. But they’re united in redefining UK hip-hop as we know it.

“I see this as the first wave – the music that’s been made before wasn’t for me. You have to respect the forefathers. But no one can deny the difference it made when Giggs got signed,” says Marga, an east London rapper building up a buzz on Twitter. “He opened the door for us. And Malik from Birmingham; he’s been doing this before anyone, he’s like a father to us.”

Charlie Sloth, whose BBC Radio 1Xtra show is to UKhip-hop what Kiss 100’s Logan Sama is to grime, agrees. “I know you can’t reinvent the wheel, but it’s like the UK scene has definitely put alloys on it.”

“Artists now are talking about issues that the young people can relate to. They have no time for US rappers and would much rather hear homegrown talent,” says Sloth. “The new wave of rap artists over here has finally realised that not only is it selling a sound but it is selling a lifestyle.”

While they might not have as much time for US rappers any more, followers of American hip-hop will have seen a Stateside parallel to the UK scene, with names such as Wiz Khalifa, Yelawolf, Nipsey Hussle, J Cole and Wacka Flocka Flame (who Giggs recently teamed up with on free download Gangster Hop) becoming popular among downloaders.

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When A Twitter Post Can Land You In Court


Yasmin Alibhai-Brown suspected trouble was brewing when her teenage daughter grew testy on the evening of Nov. 10. As Alibhai-Brown recounted to the BBC: “She was incredibly distressed before she went to bed and said, ‘Why do you have to be a journalist, mum? Every time you open the door I think somebody is going to shoot you.'” It was only after a family friend directed Alibhai-Brown to a post on Twitter that she understood her daughter’s concern: someone in the Twittersphere seemed to want her dead.

Earlier that morning Alibhai-Brown, 60, a columnist with London’s Independent newspaper, had appeared on radio and questioned whether any British politician was morally qualified to comment on human-rights abuses, including the stoning of women. That prompted Gareth Compton, a Conservative city councilor in Birmingham, to post the following message on his Twitter account: “Can someone please stone Yasmin Alibhai-Brown to death? I shan’t tell Amnesty if you don’t. It would be a blessing, really.”

Speaking to reporters the following day, Alibhai-Brown compared those comments to “incitement to murder” and suggested they could be racially motivated, as she is a Muslim of Indian descent. Compton, 38, removed the message, posted an apology for his “ill-conceived attempt at humor” and defended himself by saying that Twitter was a forum for “glib comment.” Police didn’t get the joke: they arrested him for violating the Communications Act of 2003 on suspicion of sending an offensive or indecent message and released him on bail pending further investigation. The Conservative Party added to the chorus of hisses by suspending Compton until that investigation is complete.

Continue reading When A Twitter Post Can Land You In Court